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 CASE REPORT
Year : 2023  |  Volume : 69  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 53-55

Isolated bilateral lateral geniculate body necrosis following acute pancreatitis: A rare cause of bilateral loss of vision in a young female


1 Department of Neuro-Ophthalmology, Aravind Eye Hospital and Post Graduate Institute of Ophthalmology, Kovai Medical Centre and Hospital, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Neurology, Kovai Medical Centre and Hospital, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. V M Shah
Department of Neuro-Ophthalmology, Aravind Eye Hospital and Post Graduate Institute of Ophthalmology, Kovai Medical Centre and Hospital, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jpgm.jpgm_1134_21

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Sudden bilateral visual loss because of bilateral lateral geniculate body (LGB) necrosis is a very rare entity. The mechanisms causing these isolated lesions have still not been fully understood. We report a case of sudden loss of vision in a 22-year-old female following an attack of acute pancreatitis, just after starting the paleo diet. Neuroimaging revealed bilateral LGB necrosis. Multidisciplinary approach was sought and she was subsequently managed successfully. On follow-up, her visual acuity showed improvement, and neuroimaging revealed resolution of hyperintensities in bilateral LGB with residual blooming suggestive of old hemorrhagic gliosis. The possible reasons for isolated lesions of the LGB are hemorrhagic infarction and osmotic demyelination. In the present case, we postulate a vascular pathology, possibly hypo-perfusion because of shock following acute pancreatitis.






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Online since 12th February '04
2004 - Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
Official Publication of the Staff Society of the Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Mumbai, India
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow